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Today's Features

  • Some may view this weekend’s Milton Elementary School fish fry as the end of a legacy, but perhaps it is simply evolving, as it has over the past 50 years.

    Saturday, Oct. 18, will be the last fish fry event held at the old Milton Elementary School, which will be replaced later this year with a brand-new school building in January.

    “No one really knows how [the fish fry] started,” said J.W. Sachleben,who served as MES principal from 1971-83. “I think it might have evolved out of a fall festival. However it started, it has been wonderful.”

  • By SHARON GRAVES

    The News-Democrat

    Sometimes referred to as “The Crazy Art Lady,” local artist Connie Kelley invites the public to an art show unlike any other Carroll County has seen.

    The Carroll County Public Library, which is hosting the show, also is hosting a reception for Kelley from 6:30-8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6.

    The show features 40 pieces of Kelley’s self-proclaimed “recycle art,” and will be on display in the library’s community room through the end of the month.

  • Last week, Signature Healthcare of Trimble County celebrated the achievements of six individuals with ties to the facility, inducting the “Hometown Heroes” into the Hall of Fame Café.

  • The 1938 destruction of 80 years of records couldn’t erase the rich history of Poplar Ridge Baptist Church.

    Terry Abbott, a member of the 150-year-old church’s congregation, has copies of two typewritten accounts of the church’s past – one compiled 50 years ago primarily from documents housed at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and Trimble County Clerk’s office and another recreating events from 1983-1998 – which take the place of decades of church documents inadvertently destroyed so many years ago.

  • By PHYLLIS McLAUGHLIN

    The News-Democrat

    It’s a dream three years in the making that Camp Kysoc director Jim Ebert hopes will come true the week of Oct. 6.

    Early that morning, a group of Carroll County residents led by Ebert will hit the road for Arizona and the Grand Canyon. The mission: To help Sarah Service become the first paraplegic to descend to the bottom of the canyon on the seven-mile South Kaibab Trail.

  • (Editor's note: This version also corrects the version in the Sept. 24, 2008, issue, in which it was stated that the business sells 1,000 guns a day. That actually should reflect the number of guns in stock day-to-day at the store. It was an error made during editing, and we apologize for any inconvenience the error may have caused.)

    By SHARON GRAVES

    The News-Democrat

  • By SHARON GRAVES

    The News-Democrat

    Take a step back in time to see historic craft demonstrations, sample homemade butter, have a music lesson on a duclimer, and enjoy life in Carroll County as it used to be.

    Heritage Saturday is 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,  Sept. 20 at the Masterson House on U.S. 42 West,  across from Arkema, near the Carrollton city limits.

  • By JON BECRAFT

    N-D Correspondent

    The threat of inclement weather may have kept some blues fans at bay Friday night, but overall, the 2008 Blues to the Point festival seemed to be a success.

    Volunteer Nicole Dunn said the event drew at least 500 people on Saturday.

    Throughout the event, headliners performed under the pavilion, with the Ohio River as a backdrop. On Friday, Frankfort’s Blackstone, kicked things off with its heavy “grunge”-influenced blues/rock amalgam.

  • By LORRIE KINKADE

    The Trimble Banner

    Their club name – and the fabric stretched before the ladies who gather weekly at the Trimble County Extension Office – make it clear: The Trimble Thimbles is a quiliting group.

    Sitting on the sidelines and listening to their easy banter may lead a visitor to believe this Trimble County Homemakers group is about more than just stitching together pieces of cloth.

  • As other small family eateries are succumbing to financial difficulties, Our House Restaurant is preparing to celebrate five years serving home-cooked meals.

    “I think serving real food made here at the restaurant has kept us going while others have closed their doors,” owner Sherry Burkhardt said last week. “Not too many places have that anymore.”