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Today's Features

  • By CHARLES LISTON
    Special to The Trimble Banner
    The Tri-County Community Action Agency (TCCAA) has served Henry, Oldham and Trimble Counties for 42 years with the promotion of self-sufficiency programming. Community Actions are designed to identify needs of communities and to annually design plans to address those needs.

  • Tuesday, Feb. 7
    Feed the Children meeting will be held at 6:00 p.m. at the FRYSC office at the north end of Trimble County High School.
    Thursday, Feb. 9
    Milton City Commission meets at 7 p.m. at the Milton Municipal Building on U.S. 421N
    Wednesday, Feb. 15
    Trimble County Board of Education will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Board Office.
    Monday, Feb. 20
    Trimble County Fiscal Court meets at 9 a.m. in the meeting room of the judge-executive office annex to the Trimble County Courthouse.
    Tuesday, Feb. 21

  • Monday, Jan. 23
    6:01 p.m., school visit, Trimble County High School
    7:51 p.m., Emergency Medical Services call, 100 block Luckett Ave
    Tuesday, Jan. 24
    7:51 a.m., juvenile out of control, Milton Elementary School
    12:16 p.m., information, en route to Our Lady of Peace
    2:20 p.m., process service, 100 block Sunnyside Dr
    3:11 p.m., process service, 8600 block U.S. Hwy 42W
    Wednesday, Jan. 25
    9:49 a.m., overdose, 4400 block Coopers Bottom Rd
    Thursday, Jan. 26

  • Items published in court news are public record.
    The Trimble Banner publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published.
    Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to The Trimble Banner do not imply guilt.
    The following decisions were rendered Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in Trimble County District Court with the Hon. Jerry D. Crosby III presiding.
    CIVIL

  • Viewing yourself through the eyes of another can be a very enlightening experience. It happened to me recently. What I saw was one part funny, one part mortifying and one part confusing. I hope my attempt at fractions made sense. A single word is just not sufficient to describe the impact of my realization of how much of my time is devoted to foolishness.

  • According to the American College of Sports Medicine, the top fitness trend for 2017 is wearable technology. Wearable activity monitors, such as smartphone apps and wearable devices, are commonly used and can play an important role in health behavior change.
    Use of wearable activity monitors such as activity trackers, smart watches, heart rate monitors and GPS tracking devices has shown to increase handler’s physical activity level. By checking your device a few times each day, you can see your progress and that can motivate you to gradually increase your movement.

  • Calving season will be here before we know it. Providing sound management during that time can mean more live calves, which translates to more profit for you.
    It is impor-tant to have a short calving period to allow frequent obser-vation and assis-tance if needed. Some specific things a producer can do to limit calf loss include:

  • Have you seen “This is Us?”
    It’s an NBC drama on Tuesday nights that follows the Pearson family: three siblings -- Kevin, Kate and Randall -- and their parents, Jack and Rebecca.
    Actually, Kevin and Kate are two-thirds of a set of triplets. The third triplet, Kyle, died at birth.
    After Randall, born on the same day, is left at a fire station and brought to the hospital by a fireman, Jack and Rebecca adopt him and raise all three kids as the “Big Three.”

  • Jan. 22, 1987 (30 Years Ago)
    Louisville Gas & Electric’s Wises landing plant continues to be plagued by consumer groups. Last week, two of the organizations, Paddlewheel Alliance and Utility Ratecutters of Kentucky, filed complaints to the Public Service Commission. The PSC recently set a July 1991 date for LG&E to complete the new plant. Meanwhile, the PSC continues a statewide study to determine future electricity needs.