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Extension

  • Stockpiling for fall pasture dependent on weather conditions

    Early to mid-August is generally a good time to remove cattle from selected tall fescue pastures and apply 40-100 pounds of nitrogen for stockpiling and later fall grazing. You want to select pastures that have been grazed low or clipped to 3 to 4 inches so stockpiled grass comes from new growth. Well, for most pastures, this isn’t a big problem because we pretty much don’t have any pasture growth due to the lack of rainfall.  Rain last week helped, but we aren’t out of the woods by any stretch of the imagination.

  • Drought creates different insect problems

    Hot, dry weather could have some insects feeding in greater-than-normal numbers on crops like alfalfa, tobacco and some vegetables.

  • Post-harvesting dilemma: To can or to freeze produce?

    Soon, many vegetables and fruits will be ready for harvesting, and many gardeners will have more produce than they can readily eat. Those who want to preserve fresh, summer foods for later consumption will consider either freezing or canning the harvest. But is one way of preservation better than the other? The answer depends on the type of food you want to preserve. 

    If proper techniques and correct temperatures are used, frozen foods retain greater amounts of their vitamin content, natural color, flavor and texture.

  • Post-harvesting dilemma: To can or to freeze produce?

    Soon, many vegetables and fruits will be ready for harvesting, and many gardeners will have more produce than they can readily eat. Those who want to preserve fresh, summer foods for later consumption will consider either freezing or canning the harvest. But is one way of preservation better than the other? The answer depends on the type of food you want to preserve. 

    If proper techniques and correct temperatures are used, frozen foods retain greater amounts of their vitamin content, natural color, flavor and texture.

  • Hot weather, exercise and you: Tips to stay healthy

    When we get into the heat of the summer, making sure to still get some exercise, and doing it safely, can be a challenge.  It is important to know how the hot weather affects your body, how to avoid heat related illness and when you should stop exercising out in the heat.

    How Hot Weather Affects Your Body — have you ever been really red in the face or skin after exercising in the heat?  When you exercise your body temperature will rise. When it is hot outside, that also affects your body’s temperature.

  • Plan to attend the 2012 Woodland Owners Short Course

    Make plans to join us for the 2012 Woodland Owners Short Course.  This program is a great opportunity for you and your family to learn how to enhance your woodlands and get the most from your ownership experience.  Most woodland owners are not aware of the wide variety of organizations and programs available to help them care for their woodlands.

  • Middle-age dilemma: caring for kids, parents and yourself

    Many middle-aged adults are finding themselves caring and supporting two generations- their children and their aging parents. While caregiving can be very rewarding, it often can bring additional emotional, physical and financial stresses for caregivers as they try to balance a career, parenting and elder care.

    According to the Family Caregiver Alliance, 520,000 Kentucky informal caregivers provide 570 million hours of care each year. The estimated value of this care is worth more than $5.4 billion.

  • Water landscape plants thoroughly for best results

  • Make water your drink of choice this summer

    Summer is here, and with it many opportunities to be involved in activities such as hiking, running, biking and swimming.  It is important during these normally hot and humid months that you drink enough water and stay hydrated.

    In our efforts to beat the summer heat it is easy to grab the first drink available. Often this could be sodas, vitamin water, sports and fruit drinks, smoothies, lemonade and sweetened ice tea. These drinks are high in calories and can lead to calorie over load.

  • Triple digits: Help livestock deal with the heat