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Extension

  • September is time for area farmers to reseed pastures

    As with many of the state’s crops, Kentucky cool-season forages have taken a hit from the drought and high temperatures. Accor-ding to the Kentucky Weekly Crop and Weather Report released Aug.13, more than half of the state’s pastures were considered in poor or very poor condition. At this writing we haven’t received any rain in over eight days in Trimble County. Pastures are in poor condition and will take time to recover.

  • Extension Office offers tips to reduce grocery costs

    You have probably heard that the cost of food is expected to rise next year. You can do several things to reduce your current grocery expenses and hopefully prepare yourself for the expected price increase.

  • Respiratory protection recommended for farmers

    Usually we only think of wearing respiratory protection around the farm when spraying pesticides on field crops. However, when it comes to corn and soybean harvest time, I have observed the dust so thick that combine operators had to put their lights on to see where they were going. I am not kidding! It is important for farmers to use respiratory protection to safeguard their lungs against dusts in the coming weeks and months as they harvest crops, clean out grain bins, open silos, and strip tobacco among other seasonal farming activities.

  • Ky. Grazing School focuses on improving pasture management

    Grazing is the most cost effective way for producers to feed their ruminant animals. The University of Kentucky College of Agri-culture will host the Kentucky Grazing School Sept. 11-12 at the Woodford County extension office in Versailles.

    The program begins at 7:30 a.m. and ends at 5:30 p.m. EDT each day.

    The grazing school is open to anyone. Past participants have included everyone from new farmers to those with years of grazing experience, and all have received new information and practical skills to implement in their operations.

  • Zucchini: An abundant Kentucky summer squash

    The name zucchini may sound a little odd but zucchini squash is one of the most abundant staples of Kentucky gardens and is the most popular summer squash purchases in the United States.

    Summer squash are staples in Kentucky gardens and at local farmers markets.  Their versatility makes them easy to prepare for tasty summer meals and side dishes.  Two of the more popular varieties include yellow squash and zucchini.

  • Extension office’s energy conservation tips to green up your home

    Between running air conditioners, watering plants and keeping the kids cool on a hot summer day, many of us are seeing our energy and water usage rise with the temperatures. By making some small adjustments to your home, you can conserve more energy and water. Not only is this good for the environment, but it’s good for your finances.

    Here are some tips for conserving energy and water at home during the warmer months:

  • Drought resources in County Agricultural Investment Program

    Well it looks like we missed the rain again this weekend.  We received 0.14 inches of rain at my office and 1.79 inches of rainfall for the month of July.

    In light of the current drought and extremely dry conditions in much of our Kentucky counties, the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board directed staff to develop a fact sheet, highlighting eligible investments through the 2012 CAIP that could help mitigate drought issues.  The investment areas are as follows:

    LIVESTOCK COOLING / FEEDING:

  • Proper food handling and storage

    Approximately 1 in 6 Americans will get sick from food poisoning this year. You can stay safe by following four simple steps: clean, separate, cook and chill.

    Keep hands and surfaces clean. Bacteria can live in many places.

  • Stockpiling for fall pasture dependent on weather conditions

    Early to mid-August is generally a good time to remove cattle from selected tall fescue pastures and apply 40-100 pounds of nitrogen for stockpiling and later fall grazing. You want to select pastures that have been grazed low or clipped to 3 to 4 inches so stockpiled grass comes from new growth. Well, for most pastures, this isn’t a big problem because we pretty much don’t have any pasture growth due to the lack of rainfall.  Rain last week helped, but we aren’t out of the woods by any stretch of the imagination.

  • Drought creates different insect problems

    Hot, dry weather could have some insects feeding in greater-than-normal numbers on crops like alfalfa, tobacco and some vegetables.