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Extension

  • Safely store and dispose of prescription medication

    The week of Sept. 23-29, 2012, The Partnership at Drugfree.org is launching the Medicine Abuse Project, a multi-year effort to raise public awareness about and curb prescription drug abuse.   Most of us will take a prescription medication at some point in our lives. It’s important to remember that medicine a doctor prescribes you is only intended for your use.

    Here are some tips for safely storing medication:

  • Master Stocker Program to be offered for beef producers

    Beef producers seeking to add more value to their livestock, may want to attend the Master Stocker Program, scheduled to begin on October 25. The Kentucky Master Stocker Program is an educational program that is open to any beef producer who is involved in, or interested in, stocker cattle. This program includes eight classroom sessions. Topics covered will improve your understanding of best management recommendations for stocker and backgrounding operations.

  • National Fall Prevention Day

    Anyone can fall, but the risk of falling and being seriously injured by a fall increases with age.  One in three adults over the age of 65 falls each year, causing the majority of injury and injury-related deaths among seniors.  National Falls Prevention Awareness Day is the first day of fall, Sept 22.  This day brings attention to the seriousness of falls and the ways to prevent them.  

    Four simple ways to reduce the risk of a fall include exercise, healthy vision, safe home environments and smart medication usage.  

  • Pyles offers calculations for estimating winter hay needs

    Winter hay supplies are expected to be short this year due to the extended drought. However, we did receive almost 2 inches of rain this past weekend that will go a long way in kick starting our pastures.  Right now is a good time to estimate the amount of hay you have on hand to see if you have sufficient supplies to meet your winter feeding needs. If you are going to be short, additional hay or feeds will need to be secured or you will have to cull animals from your herd.

  • Kentucky apples and sweet potatoes loaded with nutrients

    Fall—just the thought of it brings visions of colorful leaves, cooler temperatures and wonderful Kentucky fall foods, such as sweet potatoes and apples.  Not only are these foods delicious, but they are jam-packed with nutrients.

    Apples and sweet potatoes are two of nature’s great nutritional gifts, and even the wrapping is edible.  They are low in calories, fat, and sodium. 

  • Drinking enough water is essential for our health

    Ever notice how lifeless a houseplant looks when you forget to water it? Just a little water and it seems to perk back up. Water is just as needed for our bodies because it is in every cell, tissue, and organ. That is why getting enough water every day is important for your health.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, water helps keep body temperature normal.  Water lubricates and cushions your joints, protects your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues. Water gets rid of wastes through urination, perspiration, and bowel movements.

  • September is time for area farmers to reseed pastures

    As with many of the state’s crops, Kentucky cool-season forages have taken a hit from the drought and high temperatures. Accor-ding to the Kentucky Weekly Crop and Weather Report released Aug.13, more than half of the state’s pastures were considered in poor or very poor condition. At this writing we haven’t received any rain in over eight days in Trimble County. Pastures are in poor condition and will take time to recover.

  • Extension Office offers tips to reduce grocery costs

    You have probably heard that the cost of food is expected to rise next year. You can do several things to reduce your current grocery expenses and hopefully prepare yourself for the expected price increase.

  • Respiratory protection recommended for farmers

    Usually we only think of wearing respiratory protection around the farm when spraying pesticides on field crops. However, when it comes to corn and soybean harvest time, I have observed the dust so thick that combine operators had to put their lights on to see where they were going. I am not kidding! It is important for farmers to use respiratory protection to safeguard their lungs against dusts in the coming weeks and months as they harvest crops, clean out grain bins, open silos, and strip tobacco among other seasonal farming activities.

  • Ky. Grazing School focuses on improving pasture management

    Grazing is the most cost effective way for producers to feed their ruminant animals. The University of Kentucky College of Agri-culture will host the Kentucky Grazing School Sept. 11-12 at the Woodford County extension office in Versailles.

    The program begins at 7:30 a.m. and ends at 5:30 p.m. EDT each day.

    The grazing school is open to anyone. Past participants have included everyone from new farmers to those with years of grazing experience, and all have received new information and practical skills to implement in their operations.