• The basics of food label terms

    When you go grocery shopping, you’ve probably seen some new terms on the labels of your favorite foods. These terms are not meant to cause confusion but can help you make more informed choices about the foods you eat. This is a good thing, as concerns among consumers about food origin, safety and quality continue to increase.
    Here is a list of terms found on food labels and their definition as defined by the U.S. Depart-ment of Agri-culture or the Food and Drug Admin-istration.

  • Improving reproductivity in heifers

    According to the latest livestock reports, cattle numbers are on the rise again. Good management is critical.
    To improve the reproductive efficiency, and profitability, of a beef cattle operation, you must understand proper heifer development. Properly managing yearling heifer reproduction is the first step toward reproductive efficiency according to Les Anderson and Darrh Bullock, University of Kentucky Extension Beef Specialists.

  • Sundowner syndrome associated with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s disease

    If you care for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease you may notice that they get increasingly agitated, anxious, more confused or aggressive as the sun begins to set. These symptoms may be associated with sundowner syndrome. Sundowner syndrome causes people to be confused at the end of the day and into the night. It is common for individuals who are sundowning to pace, wander, ignore directions and not sleep well.

  • Radon: A dangerous invisible gas

    Radon is the No. 1 cause of lung cancer after smoking. It annually kills more than 21,000 Americans and accounts for about 12 percent of all cancer deaths. But you don’t have to be a victim, according to Beverly Miller, Senior Extension Associate for Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at the University of Kentucky.

  • Caregivers, make time for yourselves

    A new year always brings its share of resolutions aimed to improve our health, body and mind. As a caregiver, the most important resolution you can make is to take time for yourself. When you take care of yourself, you will be healthier, have more energy and enthusiasm to keep on caregiving and feel better about yourself overall.
    Here are some tips on how to carve out some “me” time in the next year.
    Take an hour of each day to do things you enjoy like exercising, reading, spending time with loved ones, engaging in a hobby or doing nothing.

  • Make farm record keeping a priority

    Record keeping may not be every farmer’s favorite activity, and probably not the reason you got into farming as a career. With time, patience and a commitment to get it done, it can make your financial life a lot less worrisome according to Steve Isaacs, Univ-ersity of Kentucky Exten-sion Agri-cultural Econo-mist.

  • Fun ways to make Christmas holiday breaks enjoyable without today’s technology

    The holidays are a wonderful time for family togetherness, but after a few days, everyone, no matter their age, begins to look for distractions. In a world of smart phones, tablets and laptops, many times our attention turns to technology, but it doesn’t have to be this way. It is possible to keep young people active and engaged without technology.

  • Getting the most from your holiday gift cards

    Gift cards are one of the most popular holiday gifts.  Many of us will add a new gift card to our wallet over the holiday season.
    Sometimes, the “rules” associated with gift cards can be a mystery, leading to many gift cards being unused.  When does the card expire? Is there a processing fee?  If there an inactivity fee? Can I use the card online? 

  • Leftover turkey talk

    The holidays are quickly approaching, and with them, the season of great eating. Soon, you’ll have more turkey and dressing than you’ll know what to do with.
    It’s a great idea to save your Thanksgiving leftovers, as it stretches your holiday food dollars and provides quick meals for your family. Leftovers must be stored and reheated safely to prevent foodborne illnesses. Follow these tips to ensure your leftovers are safe to eat:

  • Kentucky Beef Checkoff program Nov. 20

    For more than 30 years, Kentucky farmers have supported the beef industry through a per-head checkoff program. When it began in 1976, the checkoff was 10 cents per head. The passage of the 1985 Farm Bill replaced the state program with a Federal Beef Checkoff program of $1 per head when a beef animal is sold during its lifetime. Half of the money comes back to Kentucky to support state beef promotion through the Kentucky Beef Council.