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Extension

  • Starting a home composting program

    Late winter is a great time to establish a composting program. Composting reduces household waste and enriches the soil by converting leftovers and yard waste into a rich humus over a period of time. Planning now, while the garden is still fallow, allows you to decide on a method that best suits your family’s needs and to settle into a routine before gardening season starts.

  • Earth Day 2011: Pick 5 for the Environment

  • Fundamentals of Pasture Management

  • Extension info on Facebook

  • Asparagus, April’s vegetable

    This month look for this wonderfully, flavorful vegetable at your local farmer’s market. Asparagus packs in a ton of good vitamins and minerals in those stalks! Steam it, pickle it, sauté it, roast it — the possibilities are endless!

    When buying asparagus, choose stalks that are bright green with purple shaded tight tips; these are the most tender and tasty. It is best to cook it soon after buying, because asparagus can become tough and woody after several days.

  • Add foods rich in antioxidants to your springtime selections

    Foods containing antioxidants can boost a person’s immunity and go a long way in preventing disease.

    Antioxidants are vitamins, minerals and other compounds in food that protect cells in the body from damage by compounds called free radicals. Free radicals occur naturally when the body breaks down food or when it is exposed to tobacco smoke or radiation. Free radicals may play a role in heart disease, cancer, and other diseases.

  • Germinate seeds early, then transplant to garden

    Starting plants from seed early and transplanting them to the garden is a time-honored, economical and rewarding gardening tradition. Germinating seed at home increases the options for fall planting, when garden centers have stopped carrying a full array of plants, and it allows the home gardener to use saved seeds from unusual or favorite varieties that might be unavailable or hard to find.

  • “Got Cedar: Now What?” program set

    Eastern redcedar is the most widely distributed conifer in the eastern United States and many Trimble County landowners have an abundance of it. But what can you do with it?

    To find out, plan to attend the “Got Cedar: Now What” educational program this Thursday, March 24, from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Franklin County Extension Office. The Franklin County Extension Office is located at 101Lakewood Court in Frankfort.  

  • 2011 food guidelines, health and 4-H

    The newly released food guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture indicate a major shift in the recommendations that the agency is making for Americans. An increasing percentage of the population suffers from overweight, poor diet, obesity, forms of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other serious illnesses. The USDA’s revised guidelines are meant to raise awareness of the inherent risks in prevalent American lifestyle choices, characterized by an over-consumption of non-nutrient-dense highly processed foods and a sedentary lifestyle.

  • Learning to live on a reduced income

    Many families are facing economic hardship from being laid off, suffering a job loss, shortened hours per week, and other reductions driven by a weak economy. With a high level of debt and low level of savings, families can find themselves in difficult financial situations.