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Extension

  • Making preparations for tax season is half the battle

    Now is the time when we start thinking about filing our income taxes from the previous year.  Even though it’s an annual event, it can cause anxiety for many. By preparing now, you can ease the process for yourself and your tax preparer.

  • Farmers, pet owners: Be alert for winter tick problems
  • Low-cost ways to shape up

    At the start of the New Year, do you want to start exercising but are afraid of the cost as you look at your budget?  Here are some no-cost or low-cost options to get you moving without hurting the budget.

    View what you do every day as physical activity.  Honestly, you do not NEED to go to the gym to get a good aerobic workout.  If you take a look at some of the activities that you do every day you may be surprised at the opportunities available to you:

  • Pasture/hay improvement strategies

    Trimble County forage and beef producers are invited to participate in an upcoming meeting concerning forage and beef production scheduled for Monday, January 28, 2013 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be broadcast live to the Trimble County Extension Office. Dr. Garry Lacefield, UK Extension Forage Specialist, will be speaking on “Preparing for More and Better Pastures In 2013” and Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler, UK Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, will be speaking on “Strategies to Stretch the Hay Supply”.

  • Resolve to volunteer in the new year

    Now is the time of year we resolve to make changes for the better. This year, you can resolve to be a positive influence in the life of a young person by volunteering with 4-H.

    Whether leading a club, chaperoning a group of youth at 4-H camp, teaching new skills or helping judge a speech or demonstration contest, adult volunteers are an essential and invaluable part of 4-H. In fact, many 4-H programs would not be possible without the help of caring, adult volunteers.

  • Techniques for renovating hay and pasture fields

    If you have a less-than-productive grass pasture or hayfield, following a few simple renovation techniques could increase the field’s productivity, according to Garry Lacefield, UK Extension forage Specialist.  Some things you can do include planting a legume such as red clover, controlling pests and adding lime and fertilizer. Be aware though, some techniques require you to start as early as the middle of February.

  • Be mindful of your eating habits

    One of the most common New Year’s resolutions we make is to lose weight. Eating the correct portions of nutritious foods and engaging in physical activity are two keys to successful weight loss. One way that may help you keep your portions under control is to be mindful of what you eat.

    Mindful eating means you eat slowly and enjoy your food with all your senses. When you are more mindful of what you eat, you may become more aware of when you become full, which prevents overeating.

  • Organic corn production workshop

    With the price of corn around $7 per bushel, it may be surprising that there could be a more profitable alternative. But, with the price of certified organic corn in mid-December averaging $14.30 per bushel, producing certified organic corn deserves a good look, according to Lee Meyer, Extension agricultural Economist for the University of Kentucky.

  • Apply for Farm Bill participation

    I have been asked to remind local farmers of the Natural Resources Conservation Service Farm Bill Program.

    The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kentucky is encouraging landowners, farmers and producers to visit their local NRCS office now to receive information and apply for conservation technical assistance and possible financial funding opportunities.
     

  • Ways to eat better In the new year

    To help with portion control, use the smallest plate that will hold your food.

    At mealtime, serve from the stove instead of putting a serving bowl on the table.

    Make double vegetables and serve them first, to take the focus off meat.

    Switch to whole wheat pasta.

    Eat vegetarian one night a week.

    Cut back on butter or margarine – newer whole-grain breads are tasty on their own.