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Extension

  • Rotate cattle insecticide ear tags

    Insecticide-impregnated cattle ear tags have been a popular means of controlling pasture flies (horn fly and face fly) for over 20 years. The insecticide in the tag “blooms” from the plastic matrix and is then transferred to the animal’s hair coat. Plus, the fly control program travels from pasture to pasture with the animal.

  • Yard sale bargain shopping

    Yard sale season has arrived!  As the temperatures are warming up, people are beginning to realize items, such as children’s clothing or sporting equipment, they might need to purchase for spring and summer.  Yard sale shopping is a great place to find items you need at bargain prices. 
    If You Are Searching for Yard Sale Bargains…

  • The essentials on essential oils

    By now, you’ve likely heard about essential oils, but may not be familiar with what they are and their benefits and risks. Essential oils are highly concentrated oils derived from plants. While used for centuries, their popularity has recently soared, especially among individuals looking for natural healing options other than prescription medications.

  • Mulch, mold and fungi

    I am often asked the question during the summertime how to get rid of mold in landscape mulch. University of Kentucky horticulture specialist John Strang and Extension plant pathologist Paul Vincelli offer some helpful suggestions. In addition to their suggestions, I have often found that a brisk raking of the mulch will allow the surface to dry sufficiently to disrupt the life cycle of the fungi or mold.
    Mulch can be beneficial in many ways on plant beds, around foundation shrubs and other gardening locations in your yard, but mold can threaten its benefits.

  • Spring landscape programs

    I know there is still a lot of snow on the ground, but spring will eventually be here on March 20th. Here are a couple of programs that you might want to put on your March calendar.

  • Preserve sunshine in winter!

    Last summer’s canning season may be over, but you can brighten up gray winter days with homemade marmalade.  Use it to bring some sunshine to your own breakfast, or share the goodness with friends and family. This recipe from the National Center for Home Food Preservation does not need added pectin to gel, because citrus fruits contain enough of their own natural pectin.  Many of these fruits are readily available at the produce section of your grocery store.
    Citrus Marmalade
    Ingredients:
    ¾ cup grapefruit peel (from 1 grapefruit)

  • The basics of food label terms

    When you go grocery shopping, you’ve probably seen some new terms on the labels of your favorite foods. These terms are not meant to cause confusion but can help you make more informed choices about the foods you eat. This is a good thing, as concerns among consumers about food origin, safety and quality continue to increase.
    Here is a list of terms found on food labels and their definition as defined by the U.S. Depart-ment of Agri-culture or the Food and Drug Admin-istration.

  • Improving reproductivity in heifers

    According to the latest livestock reports, cattle numbers are on the rise again. Good management is critical.
    To improve the reproductive efficiency, and profitability, of a beef cattle operation, you must understand proper heifer development. Properly managing yearling heifer reproduction is the first step toward reproductive efficiency according to Les Anderson and Darrh Bullock, University of Kentucky Extension Beef Specialists.

  • Sundowner syndrome associated with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s disease

    If you care for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease you may notice that they get increasingly agitated, anxious, more confused or aggressive as the sun begins to set. These symptoms may be associated with sundowner syndrome. Sundowner syndrome causes people to be confused at the end of the day and into the night. It is common for individuals who are sundowning to pace, wander, ignore directions and not sleep well.

  • Radon: A dangerous invisible gas

    Radon is the No. 1 cause of lung cancer after smoking. It annually kills more than 21,000 Americans and accounts for about 12 percent of all cancer deaths. But you don’t have to be a victim, according to Beverly Miller, Senior Extension Associate for Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at the University of Kentucky.