.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Extension

  • Promote sportsmanship over winning

    Most adults know winning a competition isn’t a prerequisite for future success in life. Sometimes, however, we can get caught up in the moment and put too much pressure on our children to win at whatever they do, be it at school or on the athletic field. At no time of the year is this more true in Kentucky than the start of basketball season.

  • My Farewell

    Well, by the time you read this, I will be retired. I can hardly believe it has been almost thirty-five years since Carole and I moved to Trimble County. After just over two years as County Extension Agent for Agriculture in Harlan County, we moved to Trimble County in February, 1981 following Millard Maxey’s retirement. Carole grew up in Trimble County. I grew up In Carroll County, so moving here was almost like moving back home to me and, now Trimble County is my home.

  • Feeling down? It might be seasonal affective disorder

    If you find yourself feeling down, depressed, moody or irritable during a particular time of the year, you may suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder.
    According to the Mayo Clinic, SAD is a type of depression linked to seasonal changes, and it begins and ends around the same time every year. For the majority of people, symptoms start in the fall or winter but quit with the coming of spring or early summer.

  • Meeting on industrial hemp production Feb. 2
  • Tips for holiday food safety

    Food is an essential part of our lives, particularly during the holiday season, when families get together and enjoy different varieties of food prepared at home. During this time it is also very important to keep food safety in mind, specifically while serving the immunocompromised individuals including: young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and people fighting illnesses.
    SHOPPING

  • Blacklegged ticks are active

    Encounters with adult blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) (Figure 1) have in Kentucky over the past 2 years according to Lee Townsend, University of Kentucky Extension Entomology Specialist.
    This is apparently due to an increase in numbers of this species in the state and perhaps a widening of its distribution. Most recently it was reported from Crittenden County. Currently the blacklegged tick has been reported in fourteen Kentucky counties including Trimble and Carroll counties in 2013.

  • Nutrient management plan basics aid farmers

    By MICHAEL PYLES

    Manure can be a valuable fertilizer if you store and use it correctly on your farm. But just how valuable? A recent University of Kentucky research project studied 10 cattle in a confined area for 200 days.

    In that time period, the animals created an estimated 62 tons of manure. When compared to fertilizer prices the nutrient value of the manure was worth more than $2,100.

    So maybe it’s better to focus on the value rather than seeing manure management as a time-consuming hassle.

  • Foods containing GMOs have no safety concerns

    By JANE PROCTOR

    Genetically engineered foods have been available to consumers since the mid- to late-1990s. In fact, most of us have eaten food that contains ingredients from GMO crops without even knowing it.

    So how do you know which foods contain a genetically modified crop as an ingredient?

    Well, that’s not so easy.

  • Reinvent your Thanksgiving feast a day or two later

    Many people would sum up their Thanksgiving experience by saying, “it was a feast.” However, with most feasts there is the potential for leftovers and Thanksgiving is no different.
    Many of us are acquainted with leftover turkey sandwiches, turkey enchiladas and even turkey potpie. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests the following as a means of reinventing Thanks-giving leftovers:
    l Prepare turkey soup. Boil the carcass and add diced sweet potatoes, green beans and other vegetables.

  • 2015 Goat and Sheep Webinar Series, Dec. 3

    The University of Kentucky, Kentucky State University and Purdue University are    co-sponsoring the 2015 Goat and Sheep Webinar on Thursday, December 3, 2015 from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. The webinar will focus on herd health and production.
    The Trimble County Cooperative Extension Service will be hosting this webinar session. Presentation schedule is as follows: