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Extension

  • The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act dates to 1994

    The Agriculture Water Quality Act was passed by the Kentucky General Assembly in 1994. It states that landowners with 10 or more acres in agricultural production must develop a water quality plan. If you farm 10 or more acres or plan to harvest trees on 10 or more acres in Kentucky, then you are required by state law to implement an agriculture water quality plan, according to Amanda Gumbert, UK Water Quality Extension Specialist.

    Actually, very few Trimble County farmers have completed their required water quality plans.

  • Location strategies for winter feeding of livestock

    As we move closer to cold weather, it is a good time for Trimble county cattle producers to think about strategies for winter feeding of livestock, since it is a necessary part of nearly all operations.

    Choosing the right place for winter feeding can improve production and reduce threats to nearby water resources. A poorly chosen site for winter feeding can have negative impacts on soil and water quality according to Steve Higgins, UK Extension Director of Environmental Compliance.

  • Strategies for controlling weight: the “plate method”

    Better health through weight control can reduce the risk of developing chronic health problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and some cancers. One strategy for weight control is to use the “plate method,” which is a food-awareness tool that helps change habits and attitudes toward food and eating.

    The plate method helps you to:

    •Make healthy choices

    •Eat more high fiber foods

    •Control carbs

  • 4-H helps youth factor in the costs of pet ownership

    Owning a pet is a valuable and rewarding experience for youth. However, youth and parents should understand both the financial cost and commitment required for different animals. Before acquiring a pet, you should thoroughly consider the demands of owning different pets to be sure your choice will fit in with your family’s lifestyle and budget realistically and without undue hardship. A fish fits neatly on a counter top; a Great Dane needs a big yard.    

  • Diabetes and the need for healthy physical activity

    November is American Diabetes Month! Physical activity is an important part of managing type 2 diabetes. If you or someone you know is pre-diabetic or has diabetes, it is important to stay active. 

    If you have not been active, here are some important tips to get you on your way:

  • Beginning Farmer Rancher Program coming in 2012

    The Louisville area extension services will be offering the USDA Beginning Farmer Rancher Program starting in January of 2012.

    This program will be open to individuals who currently farm 20 acres or more, and who have been farming on their own for less than 10 years. The program is meant to be a very in depth farm management program, so some basic farming knowledge is required.

    The schedule of classes has been planned to hopefully minimize classes during busy times of the year.  

  • Time to rethink your wardrobe in a down economy

    As families face a new economic “normal,” they are shifting toward a cultural zeitgeist, perhaps permanent, that embraces financial conservatism.

    At home, this conservative behavior is illustrated by the rise in families who clip coupons, buy store brands, frequent discount stores, and delay purchases. Many family budgets now emphasize essential purchases, reducing debt and increasing savings, and limit treats and luxuries.

  • Making the most of Halloween

    As holidays go, Halloween ranks as one of the big events of the year. Over time, Halloween celebrations have changed, with a definite shift away from costumed kids walking through neighbors after dark with little to no supervision to the current emphasis on organized fall festivals and trick-or-treating during designated hours in business, community or downtown centers. This change also lessens the emphasis on overeating, since organized activities and sports, such as archery, are now part of some community festivities.

  • New Internet resource links Kentuckians to local foods

    In an effort to provide more opportunities for consumers to access local foods, Kentucky first lady Jane Beshear and University of Kentucky College of Agricul-ture Dean Scott Smith unveiled the Kentucky and Local Food Resources Web page recently at the American School Health Association meeting in Louisville.

  • Health and safety issues for Kentucky’s aging farmers

    Because farmers are exposed to multiple hazards throughout extended careers, physical problems can start early. To maintain health, Kentucky farm workers, whose average age is 57, higher than the average worker, must pay attention, particularly as they age, to issues caused by their way of life. Fifty-seven is also the average age of Trimble County’s 489 farmers, 46 of which are female.