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Extension

  • Small Ruminant Grazing Conference Jan. 14 in Bowling Green

    Small ruminant production is becoming big business in Kentucky as farmers realize the potential of raising sheep and goats.

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture is teaming up with sheep and goat breed associations, Kentucky State University and the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board to offer the 2012 Kentucky Small Ruminant Grazing Conference at the Western Kentucky University Ag Expo Center in Bowling Green.

    Scheduled for Jan. 14, the conference will offer many sessions for all levels of experience.

  • Take care of your vision: Have regular checkups

    From waking in the morning until resting your head on the pillow at night – your eyes are critical to your day-to-day activities. It is very important to take care of your eyes and eyesight. Often, the loss of eyesight contributes to the loss of quality of life. When an individual does not have good vision, there will be a limit in their movement and independence.

    Consider this

    Over 50, 000 people lose their sight each year. More than 101 million Americans are legally blind. Blindness is the no. 1 complication of diabetes.

  • Plan and develop a budget for wise holiday spending

    With the holiday season upon us, it’s important to remember to reduce holiday stress and the after-holiday bills by developing a budget for gift giving, food and entertainment expenses.      

  • USDA’s Beginning Farmer Rancher Program next month

    The Louisville area extension services will be offering the USDA Beginning Farmer Rancher Program starting in January of 2012.  This program will be open to individuals who currently farm 20 acres or more, and who have been farming on their own for less than 10 years.   The program is meant to be a very in depth farm management program, so some basic farming knowledge is required.   The schedule of classes has been planned to hopefully minimize classes during busy times of the year.  

  • Winter is coming: How to support a home bound friend

    People can become confined to their home for many reasons—sickness, recovery from surgery, chronic illness, disability and even weather.  With limited access to the outside, a person’s world can shrink considerably and create a disconnect from people and the community.  To help a homebound friend or relative stay engaged in life, you can:

    •Plan to call or visit when you are not rushed for time

    •Arrange a regular date to get together

    •Encourage the person to express emotions and to listen

  • Fresh fruit makes a great gift in any Christmas season

    We all have our favorite childhood memories of Christmas. It’s my favorite season of the year!

    Each Christmas, my mother and father would buy a bushel of apples and oranges. For lack of a better place to keep them, all of the fruit and Christmas candy was stored in their bedroom. Growing up on the farm, we did not have heat in the bedrooms. I can still remember opening the door and their entire bedroom was filled with the sweet fragrance of apples. I will never forget that feeling and the smells of that room as long as I live.

  • Planning for 2012 garden starts now

  • Note the importance of cooking and eating at home

    The approaching holiday season reinforces a truth about eating: Dining at home with family and friends is rewarding, fun and enjoyable. In the coming year, consider making cooking and dining at home a priority in your family. It controls food costs, helps with weight management and it brings a family together.

  • Disability requires support

    Dyslexia is a reading disability that can make concentrating and reading difficult for children.

    It’s important to remember that dyslexia has no bearing on intelligence, and in fact, many famous people are believed to have had or been diagnosed with dyslexia, including Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Tom Cruise, and baseball pitcher Nolan Ryan. Detection of learning disabilities has advanced over recent decades, so much so that dyslexia is now commonly diagnosed.

  • Winter cattle feeding that won’t break the bank

    Feeding cattle in the winter can be the single, largest expense for producers according to University of Kentucky College of Agriculture beef specialist Roy Burris and this year will not be an exception.

    Due to high input costs, mainly grain and concentrates, this year will present a challenge to producers. There are several management practices that you can use to lower feed costs and make your herds more profitable. One big way producers can decrease the amount of hay and feed they use is by extending the grazing season as long as possible.