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Extension

  • Finding ways to meet physical activity guidelines for youth

    Children’s activity levels have dropped in recent decades through a number of factors, among them, cultural shifts in the way parents and supervisors address issues of child safety and supervision, differences in built and outdoor environments, to an increase in screen time. The days of neighborhood kids safely playing kick-the-can in bucolic suburbs have given way to supervised meetings and organized activity, increased school hours with less physical activity built into the day and greater use of electronic media.

  • Teach your children to use social media responsibly

  • Practice & teach safety while working with livestock

    I grew up on a dairy and tobacco farm. My main job in the dairy was to feed the cows as they were being milked by my older brothers and to bucket feed the calves. At the time, we probably never thought much about the danger of working with livestock, but there is always the possibility of injury. Fortunately, we were never seriously hurt.  Injuries from livestock-related accidents are, however, a major source of injuries to children in agriculture.

  • Why everyone should pursue healthy physical activity

    You may see more and more information on TV, in magazine and newspapers, and online telling you that it is important to be more physically active. 

    Have you ever wondered what all the fuss was about?  These days, our lives are filled with many things that we have to do on a daily basis.  Making time to be physically active is not always easy. 

    Here are a few reasons that may help you understand why being physically active really is important!

  • Short course set to advance vegetable production in Ky.

    The Vegetable Academy: A short course to advance vegetable production in Kentucky, will be held Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, 2012, from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. each day at the Henry County Coop-erative Extension Office, located at 2151 Camp-bellsburg Road (U.S. 421) in New Castle.

  • Physical activity essentials examined for the new year

    You are ready to start the year out right!  If you have decided to start being more physically active, but it has been awhile, here is a reminder of a few essentials that you will need:

    •Talk to your healthcare provider – Before you start any physical activity, especially if you have not been that active recently, you should talk to your healthcare provider.  It is important to discuss what you are going to do and how often you plan to be active.

  • Small Ruminant Grazing Conference Jan. 14 in Bowling Green

    Small ruminant production is becoming big business in Kentucky as farmers realize the potential of raising sheep and goats.

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture is teaming up with sheep and goat breed associations, Kentucky State University and the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board to offer the 2012 Kentucky Small Ruminant Grazing Conference at the Western Kentucky University Ag Expo Center in Bowling Green.

    Scheduled for Jan. 14, the conference will offer many sessions for all levels of experience.

  • Take care of your vision: Have regular checkups

    From waking in the morning until resting your head on the pillow at night – your eyes are critical to your day-to-day activities. It is very important to take care of your eyes and eyesight. Often, the loss of eyesight contributes to the loss of quality of life. When an individual does not have good vision, there will be a limit in their movement and independence.

    Consider this

    Over 50, 000 people lose their sight each year. More than 101 million Americans are legally blind. Blindness is the no. 1 complication of diabetes.

  • Plan and develop a budget for wise holiday spending

    With the holiday season upon us, it’s important to remember to reduce holiday stress and the after-holiday bills by developing a budget for gift giving, food and entertainment expenses.      

  • USDA’s Beginning Farmer Rancher Program next month

    The Louisville area extension services will be offering the USDA Beginning Farmer Rancher Program starting in January of 2012.  This program will be open to individuals who currently farm 20 acres or more, and who have been farming on their own for less than 10 years.   The program is meant to be a very in depth farm management program, so some basic farming knowledge is required.   The schedule of classes has been planned to hopefully minimize classes during busy times of the year.