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Extension

  • Interpreting and using EPD

    With a little understanding, Expected Progeny Differences, or EPD, may actually be the best tool you, as a beef producer, have to address the genetics of your herd.

    While calculating EPD takes a lot of math, you don’t have to do the math; you just need to understand the answers. The calculation results usually appear in the first pages of a sire summary before the actual EPD tables. They may look a little confusing, but the information is very beneficial. It comes down to the fact that you are buying the DNA of a particular animal.

  • Get ready to go camping

    Spring has sprung and before you know it, summer will be here.  4-H Camp is a great way to fill those lazy summer days. At 4-H Camp, young people learn independence, responsibility, have a lot of fun and make many friends.

  • Kentucky’s strawberry crop delivers satisfying flavor

  • Agents report state’s farmers battling forage issues

    Bloat: Several Extension agents around the State are reporting that some producers are continuing to lose cattle to clover bloat. I just wanted to remind you of the factsheet that covers this topic ID-186 Managing Legume Induced Bloat in Cattle.

    Jeff Lehmkuhler, UK Extension Beef Specialist, cautions that feed additives, like Poloxalene, used to aid in reducing the risk to bloat must be consumed at the targeted levels every day.

  • Rejuvinate New Year’s resolutions: Get active this spring

    New Year’s resolutions to lose weight or get healthier may be long forgotten, but spring, with its beautiful flowers and warmer weather, is the perfect time to rejuvenate those resolutions by getting active outdoors.  

    Most of us know that regular physical activity can help prevent heart disease and type 2 diabetes, reduce the risk of some cancers, help you maintain a healthy weight; strengthen muscles and bones and improve your mental health. Regardless, most of us do not get the exercise we need.

  • Moving houseplants outside; good care of hanging baskets

    In about 10-15 days or so, it will be time to start moving some of your larger houseplants outdoors for the summer. They will get better air circulation and light exposure. This also is a good time to repot your container-bound plants according to Rick Durham, UK Extension Horticulture Specialist.

    Make sure the weather is consistently warm. Since most houseplants have a tropical origin, temperatures below 40 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit might damage them.

  • Pasture-based beef finishing for local markets event May 1

  • Tackling rising gas prices

    Every year gas prices tend to increase during the spring and summer months because of increasing demand. As people start to enjoy the warmer weather by enjoying travel and recreational activities, demand for gasoline increases and so does the price.

    It can be difficult to immediately change your lifestyle to adapt to higher gas prices; however, there are several ways you can reduce your expenditures on gasoline:

  • Navigating a farmers market helps the local economy

    Farmers markets provide a chance for the public to get high-quality, fresh foods and support farmers in their community. Selling at the markets gives farmers a chance to tell others about their operation and agriculture in general.

    In the past few years, people’s interest in farmers markets has climbed. The renewed interest is likely due to people trying to improve their diets and increasing awareness about the environmental benefits of buying foods from local farmers. 

  • Unseasonably warm temperatures bring termites

    Just Monday morning I saw my first termite advertisement on cable TV. Pest control companies are gearing up for an active termite season. Unseasonably warm springtime temperatures and rain have brought about earlier insect activity. This is typically when we see many winged termites emerge inside homes and other structures according to Mike Potter, UK Extension Entomologist. Termites swarm from the colony to disburse, fall to the ground, find mates and start new colonies in the soil.