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Extension

  • Talking turkey: Tips for selecting and preparing your special holiday bird

    To ensure that foodborne illness isn’t a guest at your holiday table, follow these tips from USDA when buying and preparing your turkey.
    When buying a turkey, allow one pound per person. If you buy a fresh turkey, check the “sell by” or “use by” date to make sure that it really is fresh, and buy it only 1 or 2 days before you cook it.

  • Using body condition scores as indicators of herd health

    Early winter is an optimum time to prepare your spring-calving herd for reproductive success. Adequate nutrition from about 50 to 80 days prior to calving is critical to maximizing a cow’s ability to rebreed and maintain a 365-day calving interval according to Les Anderson, University of Kentucky Extension Beef specialist. A cow that gets inadequate nutrition or is thin at calving and breeding will take longer to come into heat and will require more services to conceive.

  • Keep holiday portion sizes in check
  • Holiday travel tips

    With the holiday season quickly approaching, many families are in the process of planning trips to visit family and friends. Unfortunately, the holidays can often be the most expensive time of the year to travel, especially if you are flying. Below are some travel tips that may help you save money during the holiday season:
    Book early. If you have yet to book a hotel room or plane tickets, book soon. Booking airline tickets, rental cars and hotel rooms early is a great way to save money.

  • Trimble Extension agent says Help TCHS FFA this weekend!

    Trimble County High School Vocational Agriculture teacher Courtney Scott is seeking your help in raising funds for their FFA chapter. Courtney has obtained the assistance of Craig and Landreth Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram dealership for a “Ride and Drive” event this weekend on Saturday October 31st. The event runs from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Supporters of FFA are encouraged to stop by, take a test drive and complete a survey. One hundred test drives will raise $2,000 for our local FFA chapter. The dealership is located at 6424 West Highway 146 in Crestwood, KY 40014.

  • All about pumpkins

    Few things say fall better than pumpkins. Whether you use them to cook, decorate or carve, chances are a pumpkin in some form or fashion will be a part of your seasonal celebrations. In fact, 80 percent of the U.S. pumpkin supply is available in October.
    Here are some interesting facts about the season’s favorite gourd.
    Pumpkins originated in Central America and get their name from the Greek word pepon, which means large melon. Pumpkins are in the same family with cucumbers, squash, zucchini and melons.

  • Fall tree color in Kentucky

    All summer they’ve remained hidden beneath a green cloak. But as fall continues, the parade of brilliant tree leaf colors will slowly put on a spectacular show across Kentucky.

  • Stink bug army on the move

    Stink bugs, small shield-shaped insects, are starting to ramp up their army and are becoming more noticeable around Kentucky this fall. Although several species of stink bugs are common in the state, the brown marmorated stink bug is most important now because its mission is winter shelter.

  • Make sure your horses have enough hay for winter

    With winter just around the corner, hopefully you have secured sufficient hay supplies for your winter feeding needs. How do you estimate the amount of hay you will need? If you have mature horses at maintenance level, you would want to feed a mainly forage diet.
    The estimate would be similar to a 1,100-pound horse eating 2 percent of its body weight. That equals 22 pounds of hay per day. Feeding for 120 days, December through March would equal 1.3 tons of hay per horse according to Bob Coleman, University of Kentucky Extension Equine Specialist.

  • Building character through 4-H livestock programs

    Participating in livestock programs are one of the most recognized aspects of 4-H, but along with learning about animals young people can develop positive character traits to become the leaders of tomorrow.
    Livestock projects allow 4-H’ers to get firsthand experience in raising and caring for an animal. Caring for an animal teaches youth responsibility. As the animal grows, young people can take pride in knowing they helped the animal develop and mature.