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Extension

  • Limiting weaning stress for beef cattle

    Weaning is usually a stressful time of year for calves. Limiting weaning stress in beef calves can increase their daily gain. Calves often experience four types of stress: physical, environmental, nutritional and social. You can help them avoid or minimize these with proper management.

  • At the farmers market: fresh Kentucky apples

    As summer comes to a close and September approaches, not only does fall bring corn mazes, squash and pumpkins, it is also a perfect time to visit local orchards to pick the freshest apples.
    A medium size apple—about 2 to 2.5 inches in diameter—contains approximately 75 calories and provides bulk in the diet, helping the body digest food. Apples are low in sodium and high in potassium, making them a great natural snack.

  • Join Extension Homemakers

    If you are interested in learning something new or giving back to your community, you may consider joining the Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association. Clubs across Kentucky are currently recruiting new individuals.
    The goal of KEHA is to improve the quality of life for families and communities. Each group carries out this objective differently based on region or interest.

  • Hints for keeping the family active when school starts
  • Beef cattle markets stabilizing but remain below 2016 levels

    Most beef cattle-producing states have been able to escape drought conditions so far this year and Kentucky producers enjoyed significant rainfall in early July that put them in a good position this summer. Still, weather aside, Cattle prices have improved from recent declines but remain lower than this time last year.

  • At the farmers market: corn

    For some of us, eating fresh corn off the cob is one of our top summertime, food-related experiences. Corn is one of the many great offerings at the roadside produce markets this month.
    Farmers harvest corn in July and August in Kentucky. You can boil, steam, roast, microwave or grill it. It is naturally sweet so try to avoid using butter, salt or other seasonings that make it unhealthy. Instead, flavor with fresh lemon or lime juice, or season it with fresh herbs like thyme, paprika, garlic powder or black pepper.

  • Create and keep a new healthy habit

    Habits can be good or they can be not-so-good.  Have you ever tried to change on of your not-so-good habits, only to go back to your usual routine?  It is hard to keep up the motivation for a change in behavior.
    Here are a few things to keep in mind when you are trying to create and keep a new, healthy habit.
    It does not have to be “all-or-nothing”

  • Steps to give your summer garden new life

    Summer’s heat and weather can take a toll on your flower garden. But with a little extra care, it is possible to bring it back to life for a few more weeks of vibrant color and texture.
    It’s always important to make sure annuals and perennials get plenty of water this time of year, especially in later summer.  Annuals, in particular, will start to decline without an adequate supply of water to keep the ground moist.

  • Home canning tips

    Now is a great time to start canning. You can preserve some of your own fruits and vegetables or take advantage of the bounty of locally grown fruits and vegetables at your county’s farmers market. Home canning can save money, provide gifts for family and friends and leave you with a great feeling of accomplishment. For the best canned products be sure to follow USDA recommendations.
    l Start with fresh fruits and vegetables. Spoilage and loss of vitamins and nutrients begins right after harvest so you want to can fruits and vegetables at their peak. 

  • Delicious Kentucky peaches

    There is nothing better than a fresh ripe peach. The peach is a member of the rose family. It was first cultivated in China and revered as a symbol of longevity. The image was placed on pottery and received as a gift with great esteem. Travelers along caravan routes carried the peach seed to Persia before it was cultivated in Europe. In the early 1600s Spanish explorers brought it to the New World and by the 1700s missionaries had established peaches in California. The United States now produces 25 percent of the total world market for peaches.